The Three Pillars of Kickstarter Success

Article

Article
Posted by:
Andrew Birkett
Date Published:
Mar 3, 2019

Here at Atheris Entertainment we’ve done a fair share of Kickstarter campaigns. We’ve launched three projects to-date (Cul-De-Sac Conquest, Mutant Crops & Supernatural Socks) and have several in development that we’ll be launching in 2019. Though, we’ve also recently begun working as a collaborator with other creators both co-publishing partners and clients of our Kickstarter consulting business. The first of these projects to hit Kickstarter was Ore: The Mining Game (a co-published project with Quick Simple Fun Games), which fortunately funded over 265% of its initial $10,000 funding goal. Now that we’ve successfully funded four Kickstarter campaigns we wanted to share what we view as our three pillars of success.

The Three Pillars:

  1. Team
  2. Product
  3. Marketing

Team

In entrepreneurship/investing circles there are a plethora of phrases, which all equate to roughly the same thing – the power of people; Whether it is “bet on the jockey, not the horse” or “I’d rather have an A entrepreneur with a B idea than an A idea with a B entrepreneur” the moral is that people matter. A great leader and a great team can surely foster and grow a more robust community and fandom than a less passionate, friendly or charismatic team even if their products are roughly equivalent.

Forming the right team for a project is likely the most important part of the process. All too often Kickstarters fail. In fact, 63.37% of projects don’t hit their funding goal. Most of these creators lack the skills necessary to bring a product to market. Some may lack an artistic eye, some may not understand the underlying marketing concepts necessarily to fund a project and still others might present their idea before it is ready for market. Though, likely the largest single reason for failure is inexperience.

It is also incredibly difficult to learn how to Kickstarter a project as a first-time creator. First-time creators are significantly more likely to fail than their more experienced counter parts. In 2015 Kickstarter posted analytics on how massive the jump is:

Which begs the question, “what can first-time creators do in order to increase their likelihood of funding?” The most obvious answer is that they need to form a team that is comprised of at least one former creator who can guide the team through the campaign process.

Kickstarter creators need to determine what their strengths and weaknesses are and determine whether they require additional assistance. This could include marketing professionals, legal personnel, artists and graphic designers, and industry insiders.

Product

Though a great product will not succeed with a bad team the inverse is also true. Even the best team in the world will likely not be able to fund subpar products. There are of course exceptions to any rule, but it is significantly easier to fund a project if the product is something that solves a market need. Consumers need to want the product. Contrary to popular belief Kickstarter pledges are not donations. They are pre-orders. Backers are willing to pay in advance for a product that won’t be made for months or even years. That level of trust and support is truly incredible and should not be taken for granted. Creating and delivering an exceptional product is a must.

An exceptional product is one that solves a need, fills a void in the market, and is priced competitively.

The presentation of the project is also incredibly important. Having tremendous artwork and graphic design for the project page and an excellent video will help sell the product.

Marketing

Marketing is difficult. Though, it is imperative for a successful Kickstarter campaign. First-time creators often lack the understanding to build a community before starting their campaigns. They think that they’ll launch the campaign and that the Kickstarter will magically accumulate backers and build their base for them.

However, creators must have a community going into the campaign. They cannot simply hope that Kickstarter will do all the heavy lifting for them.

Kickstarter creators are oftentimes backers themselves. Successful creators become a part of the community in which they seek to launch projects in. They’re active in the physical and virtual communities. They create social media accounts, they gain fans as well as email subscribers and they pay for marketing efforts to their target demographic.

Conclusion

First-time creators are significantly more likely to fail to fund their campaign than their more experienced counterparts. Forming the right team before going to Kickstarter is a must. If the team does not have the  necessary members then they should recruit members or consultants to assist them. They also need to ensure that their product is one that fills a market need. They need to become part of the community and market their product correctly.

If your team could use some help with your first Kickstarter campaign feel free to reach out to us at snakes@atherisentertainment.com with the subject “Kickstarter Consulting.”

The Three Pillars of Kickstarter Success

Article

Here at Atheris Entertainment we’ve done a fair share of Kickstarter campaigns. We’ve launched three projects to-date (Cul-De-Sac Conquest, Mutant Crops & Supernatural Socks) and have several in development that we’ll be launching in 2019. Though, we’ve also recently begun working as a collaborator with other creators both co-publishing partners and clients of our Kickstarter consulting business. The first of these projects to hit Kickstarter was Ore: The Mining Game (a co-published project with Quick Simple Fun Games), which fortunately funded over 265% of its initial $10,000 funding goal. Now that we’ve successfully funded four Kickstarter campaigns we wanted to share what we view as our three pillars of success.

The Three Pillars:

  1. Team
  2. Product
  3. Marketing

Team

In entrepreneurship/investing circles there are a plethora of phrases, which all equate to roughly the same thing – the power of people; Whether it is “bet on the jockey, not the horse” or “I’d rather have an A entrepreneur with a B idea than an A idea with a B entrepreneur” the moral is that people matter. A great leader and a great team can surely foster and grow a more robust community and fandom than a less passionate, friendly or charismatic team even if their products are roughly equivalent.

Forming the right team for a project is likely the most important part of the process. All too often Kickstarters fail. In fact, 63.37% of projects don’t hit their funding goal. Most of these creators lack the skills necessary to bring a product to market. Some may lack an artistic eye, some may not understand the underlying marketing concepts necessarily to fund a project and still others might present their idea before it is ready for market. Though, likely the largest single reason for failure is inexperience.

It is also incredibly difficult to learn how to Kickstarter a project as a first-time creator. First-time creators are significantly more likely to fail than their more experienced counter parts. In 2015 Kickstarter posted analytics on how massive the jump is:

Which begs the question, “what can first-time creators do in order to increase their likelihood of funding?” The most obvious answer is that they need to form a team that is comprised of at least one former creator who can guide the team through the campaign process.

Kickstarter creators need to determine what their strengths and weaknesses are and determine whether they require additional assistance. This could include marketing professionals, legal personnel, artists and graphic designers, and industry insiders.

Product

Though a great product will not succeed with a bad team the inverse is also true. Even the best team in the world will likely not be able to fund subpar products. There are of course exceptions to any rule, but it is significantly easier to fund a project if the product is something that solves a market need. Consumers need to want the product. Contrary to popular belief Kickstarter pledges are not donations. They are pre-orders. Backers are willing to pay in advance for a product that won’t be made for months or even years. That level of trust and support is truly incredible and should not be taken for granted. Creating and delivering an exceptional product is a must.

An exceptional product is one that solves a need, fills a void in the market, and is priced competitively.

The presentation of the project is also incredibly important. Having tremendous artwork and graphic design for the project page and an excellent video will help sell the product.

Marketing

Marketing is difficult. Though, it is imperative for a successful Kickstarter campaign. First-time creators often lack the understanding to build a community before starting their campaigns. They think that they’ll launch the campaign and that the Kickstarter will magically accumulate backers and build their base for them.

However, creators must have a community going into the campaign. They cannot simply hope that Kickstarter will do all the heavy lifting for them.

Kickstarter creators are oftentimes backers themselves. Successful creators become a part of the community in which they seek to launch projects in. They’re active in the physical and virtual communities. They create social media accounts, they gain fans as well as email subscribers and they pay for marketing efforts to their target demographic.

Conclusion

First-time creators are significantly more likely to fail to fund their campaign than their more experienced counterparts. Forming the right team before going to Kickstarter is a must. If the team does not have the  necessary members then they should recruit members or consultants to assist them. They also need to ensure that their product is one that fills a market need. They need to become part of the community and market their product correctly.

If your team could use some help with your first Kickstarter campaign feel free to reach out to us at snakes@atherisentertainment.com with the subject “Kickstarter Consulting.”