Kickstarter Advice Marketing Your Campaign

Article

Article
Posted by:
Andrew Birkett
Date Published:
Sep 7, 2019

Creating a Kickstarter campaign is a big endeavor. It’s a lot of work, time, money and energy. It’s mentally exhausting trying to learn the ins and outs of the platform and our goal is to simplify that process for other creators. In this article series we’ll go over some advice for Kickstarter creators. Though this advice is especially tailored to Kickstarter it applies to crowdfunding on any platform.

In this specific instance we’re going to outline the do’s and don’ts of marketing your Kickstarter campaign. Marketing is tough and one of the most difficult and time consuming parts of a campaign. Without proper marketing even the best of projects will fail to raise the funds the could have otherwise gathered.

Do:
  1. Become a part of the community
  2. Utilize existing audiences
  3. Build hype well before launch

Become a part of the community

If your community is active on social media then become a part of that social media community. If there are large conventions where you can meet other creators, attend as many as you feasibly can. Make sure that you’re known within the community in which you hope to join. When you want to create your own project the community can do a lot to ensure that you don’t make too many mistakes. Getting feedback from your prospective audience is incredibly valuable.

Furthermore, these folks are much more likely to give your project a chance if they already know and respect you.

Of note, creating social media accounts for your company and/or project is great. Though, being active on social media is about more than just posting your own content. You need to do more. You need to engage with other creators and fans of your product offering. Genuinely befriend people. Talk with other creators and learn from them. Purchase their products. Provide them value and support in exchange for their assistance.

Utilize existing audiences

If you have an existing audience – use it. This could be your family and friends, particularly if this is your first project, it could be fans of your work or possibly the very people you’ve met through being active in the community.

In creative industries your competitors are others trying to succeed in the same ways you are, but they often are also consumers of the products you create, which is why they create those products in the first place. Other creators can help you market your project, may support it financially and can provide advice. Support other campaigns to see what made you select those projects and see their marketing pitch. What about the campaign drew you in?

Finally, if you don’t have a large audience consider bringing on team members who do. For comic book projects you may find an artist who already has a large following, or a colorist that’s well known in the industry. Getting the right team together is key.

Build hype well before launch

You’ll want people to know about the project well in advance of the campaign running. Getting feedback throughout the process is definitely a large way of making a better project and also getting the project seen by more people. Posting updates regularly on your social media channels and in Facebook Groups, Reddit or other communities (check their self-promotion rules first) is hugely beneficial.

Paid marketing efforts to your audience are also great. Creating targeted Facebook ads and learning who responds to what can be be done with very small initial budgets – as low as a few dollars per ad. Test different demographics, audiences, marketing copy, images, etc. If you work with these advertisements well in advance of your campaign you’ll have the targeting down for when you launch the project and increase your marketing budget with data and insights instead of blindly.

Don’t:
  1. Spam your project to industry groups
  2. Make your first communication with someone about your project

Spam your project to industry groups

You need to post your project in industry groups. However, that should NEVER be your first post in a group and all your posts should not be exclusively about your project. You need to be a true member of the community. If you made a game, then you surely play games, right? Take photos of the games you’re playing, ask for recommendations for other games, respond to other posts. If you only talk about your project no one will see any substance in your posts. If you are well known for being a cool, genuine, and inspiring creator when you launch a project and discuss it others won’t see it as shameless self-promotion. They’ll sincerely want to support you and the project.

Make your first communication with someone about your project

I’ve had several creators add me on Facebook and instantly invite me to like their page or private message me a link to their Kickstarter campaign. I will always delete that person and will NEVER back their project, no matter how beautiful it is. I don’t want to be seen as a source of money. I want to be seen as a peer. If I have spoken with someone several times and they send me their project I’m fine with the sort of reminders. If I know the creator and they’ve taken time to get to know me, supported my projects, etc. I am happy to return the favor of getting to know them and supporting their projects.

Don’t make our first interaction about your project. Provide me value.

Conclusion

Marketing is hard, but if you put in the work it is very possible to do well.

If you need assistance with your crowdfunding campaign consider hiring a Kickstarter consultant. We’re currently available. Email us at snakes@atherisentertainment.com with the subject “Kickstarter Consulting” for a free consultation and to get information on our rates.

Kickstarter Advice Marketing Your Campaign

Article

Creating a Kickstarter campaign is a big endeavor. It’s a lot of work, time, money and energy. It’s mentally exhausting trying to learn the ins and outs of the platform and our goal is to simplify that process for other creators. In this article series we’ll go over some advice for Kickstarter creators. Though this advice is especially tailored to Kickstarter it applies to crowdfunding on any platform.

In this specific instance we’re going to outline the do’s and don’ts of marketing your Kickstarter campaign. Marketing is tough and one of the most difficult and time consuming parts of a campaign. Without proper marketing even the best of projects will fail to raise the funds the could have otherwise gathered.

Do:
  1. Become a part of the community
  2. Utilize existing audiences
  3. Build hype well before launch

Become a part of the community

If your community is active on social media then become a part of that social media community. If there are large conventions where you can meet other creators, attend as many as you feasibly can. Make sure that you’re known within the community in which you hope to join. When you want to create your own project the community can do a lot to ensure that you don’t make too many mistakes. Getting feedback from your prospective audience is incredibly valuable.

Furthermore, these folks are much more likely to give your project a chance if they already know and respect you.

Of note, creating social media accounts for your company and/or project is great. Though, being active on social media is about more than just posting your own content. You need to do more. You need to engage with other creators and fans of your product offering. Genuinely befriend people. Talk with other creators and learn from them. Purchase their products. Provide them value and support in exchange for their assistance.

Utilize existing audiences

If you have an existing audience – use it. This could be your family and friends, particularly if this is your first project, it could be fans of your work or possibly the very people you’ve met through being active in the community.

In creative industries your competitors are others trying to succeed in the same ways you are, but they often are also consumers of the products you create, which is why they create those products in the first place. Other creators can help you market your project, may support it financially and can provide advice. Support other campaigns to see what made you select those projects and see their marketing pitch. What about the campaign drew you in?

Finally, if you don’t have a large audience consider bringing on team members who do. For comic book projects you may find an artist who already has a large following, or a colorist that’s well known in the industry. Getting the right team together is key.

Build hype well before launch

You’ll want people to know about the project well in advance of the campaign running. Getting feedback throughout the process is definitely a large way of making a better project and also getting the project seen by more people. Posting updates regularly on your social media channels and in Facebook Groups, Reddit or other communities (check their self-promotion rules first) is hugely beneficial.

Paid marketing efforts to your audience are also great. Creating targeted Facebook ads and learning who responds to what can be be done with very small initial budgets – as low as a few dollars per ad. Test different demographics, audiences, marketing copy, images, etc. If you work with these advertisements well in advance of your campaign you’ll have the targeting down for when you launch the project and increase your marketing budget with data and insights instead of blindly.

Don’t:
  1. Spam your project to industry groups
  2. Make your first communication with someone about your project

Spam your project to industry groups

You need to post your project in industry groups. However, that should NEVER be your first post in a group and all your posts should not be exclusively about your project. You need to be a true member of the community. If you made a game, then you surely play games, right? Take photos of the games you’re playing, ask for recommendations for other games, respond to other posts. If you only talk about your project no one will see any substance in your posts. If you are well known for being a cool, genuine, and inspiring creator when you launch a project and discuss it others won’t see it as shameless self-promotion. They’ll sincerely want to support you and the project.

Make your first communication with someone about your project

I’ve had several creators add me on Facebook and instantly invite me to like their page or private message me a link to their Kickstarter campaign. I will always delete that person and will NEVER back their project, no matter how beautiful it is. I don’t want to be seen as a source of money. I want to be seen as a peer. If I have spoken with someone several times and they send me their project I’m fine with the sort of reminders. If I know the creator and they’ve taken time to get to know me, supported my projects, etc. I am happy to return the favor of getting to know them and supporting their projects.

Don’t make our first interaction about your project. Provide me value.

Conclusion

Marketing is hard, but if you put in the work it is very possible to do well.

If you need assistance with your crowdfunding campaign consider hiring a Kickstarter consultant. We’re currently available. Email us at snakes@atherisentertainment.com with the subject “Kickstarter Consulting” for a free consultation and to get information on our rates.